Steve Dominey

Yorkshire & Fife Fancy Canaries

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WEBSITE CREATED

5th JAN 2013

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Yorkie Supreme Golding Feature

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The Golding Model - Perfected?

 

An article written by Steve and Bob for Cage & Aviary birds during 2014

 

The Yorkshire canary is admired as a breed throughout the bird fancy with many breeders of other varieties openly admiring its beauty.

The Golding model has for many years provided the serious breeder of Yorkshire Canaries a challenge of the highest level in respect to breeding birds that resemble the ideal shape and exhibit the qualities as laid down in the written and pictorial standard. Over many years several leading studs in the UK and Ireland have bred and exhibit some wonderful exhibits showing the true value of the breeders art. Our friends on the continent have also done likewise. These winning exhibits showed characteristics of the requirements and are acknowledged as the leading Yorkshires of the day.

 

Having said that it is our opinion that very few birds could be regarded as being so close to the model that you could quote them as being ‘the model’ and none of them have surpassed the model in all of the required exhibition points.

We would go as far to say that many of the Yorkshire canaries shown today at shows in the UK are a long way from the model and that the standard overall is at its lowest for many years when compared to the ideal. Many birds are over rated just because they happen to be the best that may be on show on the day be it within their class or as a special winner. The birds exhibited are of differing shape and sizes, hardly any two are alike. We read in the YCC handbook that many of todays winning birds are longer than the model, yet many top winners are certainly shorter than the model in body and lack an all important feature, namely a lack of taper to the body.

This situation does not help judges as you can only judge what is placed before you yet some have clearly stated that they are looking for differing features than the model presents. Until such times that the standard is changed if theses judges do not consider that they are judging to the current model then they should not accept invitations to judge.

 

So what is wrong with many of todays Yorkshires exhibited in the UK?

Firstly it surely does not escape the mind that the ‘Golding’ model is a beautifully proportioned bird showing graceful lines, posture and quality.

It is to be clothed in an immaculate feather, is to stand in the correct position and be tapered, rounded and to quote the standard be of the length of ‘approximately 6 ¾ inches with corresponding symmetrical proportions’. So we would now ask how many birds shown on the show bench today have all of the requirements of the ideal, the Golding model? Last show season we saw differing types of exhibits winning at the leading shows. We have birds winning classes and major specials with faults that should not be accepted, yet some of these are being classed as our best birds. Yorkshires that are exhibited today are of differing shape and sizes, hardly any two are alike.

 

Earlier this year the Yorkshire canary club balloted its members to ask if they were in agreement of opening discussions in respect to a standard change. The club reported the result of the ballot within the pages of cage & Aviary birds as ‘when members denied the club the opportunity of begin formally investigating weather a change to the model was required’. This would imply that the officials of the club were in favour of discussing changes to the model. It is our believe that if the voting had gone for discussing the changing of the model this would of caused unnessassry division within the fancy when it is far from its stongest. Falling entries on the show bench show that our hobby is faltering so we have arrived at the time to pull together and look to improve the standard of bird being generally shown.Yorkshires that are exhibited today are of differing shape and sizes, hardly any two are alike.

 

We read in the YCC handbook that many of today’s winning birds are considered longer than the model, yet many top winners are certainly shorter in body than the model and lack length behind the leg and also lack taper. This situation does not help judges as you can only judge what is placed before you yet some have openly stated that they are looking for differing features than the model presents. The ideal shape has always been termed ‘as if shaped on a lathe’ yet many birds are as thick behind the legs as in front. On many exhibits the feather quality is overlooked by the exhibitor and judge alike yet the standard asks for close tight feather not broad, soft feather. On the internet several breeders from overseas have at times placed drawings or created models of how they see the Yorkshire canary. Most of these are best to be described as grotesque with no balance or grace, excelling in abnormal depths of top end, short in body and legs positioned wrongly and showing no taper of body. These are of no help to the fancy, they are not the ‘qualities’ that we seek in a Yorkshire Canary.

 

So what is wrong with many of today’s Yorkshires exhibited in the UK? Firstly it surely does not escape the mind that the ‘Golding’ model is a beautifully proportioned bird showing graceful lines, posture and overall quality of the highest standard. It is to be clothed in an immaculate feather, is to stand in the correct position which includes correct leg angle, and be tapered, rounded and to quote the standard be of the length of ‘approximately 6 ¾ inches with corresponding symmetrical proportions’.

 

So we would now ask how many birds shown on the show bench today have all of the requirements of the ideal, the Golding model?

Last show season we saw differing types of exhibits winning at the leading shows. We have some birds winning classes and major specials with faults that should not be accepted. One namely being birds that possess straight legs that carry their line through the centre of the body. These birds have a tendency to lock legs either dead straight of even forward of the joint. You only need to look at the pictorial model to see how important the angles and position of the legs should be in helping to obtain the correct position of the perch. This is a bad fault which seems to be ignored by some judges.

 

Look at the position of the leg in relation to the body there needs to be as much behind the perch as in front of the perch. Look how high the bird needs needs to be above the top rail of the show cage. There are still some high quality birds being exhibited in recent years that can be used as a reference point for the novice to strive for and some shows have produced some very good winning birds. The result of the Yorkshire canary club ballot was reported within the pages of Cage & Aviary birds as ‘when members denied the club the opportunity of begin formally investigating whether a change to the model was required’. This would imply that they considered that there was a need to discuss potential changes. It is our believe that if the voting had been in favour of discussing the changing of the model this would have caused major division within the fancy when it is far from its stongest.

 

Falling entries on the show bench prove that the Yorkshire canary hobby is faltering within the UK so we have arrived at the time to pull together and look to improve the standard of bird being generally shown. Judging standards appear to be variable which can be in part the judges impression of the ideal requirements of the standard as well as the differing types of birds being benched. Now that we have the decision to continue with the ‘Golding model’ we all need to embrace its qualities and attempt to breed birds that ‘resemble the model’. Until such times that the standard is changed if theses judges do not consider that they are or have not been judging to the current model then they should not accept invitations to judge. The Yorkshire canary is admired as a breed throughout the bird fancy with many breeders of other varieties openly admiring its beauty. Its popularity on the continent appears to be at an all time high. The Yorkshire canary within its ‘Golding model’ guise has many advocates world wide

 

With the model debate now over how does the discerning breeder make some headway within the Yorkshire canary fancy? Firstly they will need to learn the requirements of the breed and try to develop a eye for its shape and qualities. They will need help from the established breeders to move forward with suitable stock. Today this does seem to be a problem as the majority of breeders seem to keep smaller studs and therefore breed less birds than perhaps they did in the past.